Skip to main content

Real World Example: Computer-Aided Embroidary

Just to show you how technology has become an intimate part of our lives, I wanted to relate a support call I had today. A client called about checking out a new Windows Vista laptop she purchased, along with the device pictured here...a Husqvarna Viking Designer I USB.

While the PC issue mainly had to do with lack of memory, the embroidery machine fascinated me. Here was what looked like a sewing machine, but instead of the usual direction and thread tension controls was a sizable LCD screen. On the side was a USB port, exactly like you would see on a printer. In fact, that was exactly what this machine was...a printer.

The machine even has firmware that has to be updated, just like your Internet routers and high-end printers. To apply the upgrades, we "booted" the machine into "software update" mode and then shipped over the firmware from the PC.

It just goes to show that even the most fundamental crafting is finding a way to put technology to use.

Comments

Anonymous said…
Douglas,
I also have a client that uses a verson of this sewing machine. Other then email, that is the only reason she uses her laptop. I have been toying with the idea of purchasing the conversion software to convert my company logo and have her create some shirts for me. Its really cool.

Dean

Popular posts from this blog

Audio: Social Networks - LIVE from the Library Internet Seminar - November 8, 2007

This night we talked about social networks, the Writer's Guild Strike, traditional media and the future of new media. Listen to this seminar Links discussed in this seminar: MySpace - Add me as a friend in MySpace Facebook - Add me as a friend on Facebook LinkedIn - Connect to me on LinkedIn YouTube - Watch my videos on YouTube Ning.com Jott.com Garden Fork TV The Minimalist with Mark Bittman quarterlife Blogger.com Wordpress.com Mixergy.com The Wish Book Holiday Podcast Project

This DIY domino clock tells the time using three LED-lit tiles via Arduino Blog

After coming across Carbon Design Group’s Domino Wall Clock, which uses electronic magnetic coil motors to reveal white dots, Instructables member “Kothe” decided to create a simplified version of their own. The clock is comprised of three custom dominoes — the first tile for hours, the second and third for minutes. Unlike its inspiration, Kothe’s device uses addressable RGB LEDs as dots that allow for a variety of colors to shine through. Read This DIY domino clock tells the time using three LED-lit tiles via Arduino Blog An interesting link found among my daily reading

Onion Pi makes your web traffic anonymous via Open Electronics

Hmmm, might be an easy (and relatively cheap) way to play around with Tor and learn a bit more about this anonymizing service. -- Douglas Adafruit’s Onion Pi is a Tor proxy that makes your web traffic anonymous, allowing you to use the internet free of snoopers and any kind of surveillance. Follow Adafruit’s tutorial on setting up Onion Pi and you’re on your way to a peaceful anonymous browsing experience. Tor is an onion routing service – every internet packet goes through 3 layers of relays before going to your destination. This makes it much harder for the server you are accessing (or anyone snooping on your Internet use) to figure out who you are and where you are coming from. Read Onion Pi makes your web traffic anonymous via Open Electronics * A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs ** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out! An interesting link found among my daily reading