Thursday, November 14, 2019

Historical Technology Books - 35 in a series - Kilobaud 1977 01

Technology isn't just computers, networks and phones. Technology has always been part of the human experience. All of our ancestors have looked for ways to help them survive and do less work for more gain. Archive.org has a host of old technology books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. Many of the technologies discussed within these books are being put to use again these days in the back to the land" and homesteading movements. You might even find something that could address one of your own garden or farm issues but has been lost to time and history. Enjoy! --Douglas

Kilobaud Microcomputing was originally conceived as KiloByte Microcomputing but that name went unused as the publishers didn't feel like advertising their goals. The Kilobaud prefix was eventually removed as well and Microcomputing lived on.

Microcomputing was a typical general purpose Personal Computer magazine like Byte and Creative Computing. It offered product reviews, technical information and the occasional program listing for the reader to type in. — Vintage Computer

Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

8K MEMORY CARDS ANNOUNCED -

For those 6800 systems needing the maximum possible amount of memory, Southwest Technical Products announ- ces 8K memory cards. These memory expansion cards have 8K Bytes of low power MOS memory per board. These kits feature the new 4K static RAMS that are now becoming available. These new RAMS make it possible to put 8K of memory on a board without crowding the parts, or using small hard to solder connecting lines. These new memory boards feature DIP switch address selec- tion and a write protect switch on each board.

The low power consumption of this new memory board makes it possible to use up to 48K of memory in the stand- ard 6800 chassis with the stock power supply. Priced at $250.00 these mem- ory cards cost no more than less dense memories from other sources.


Wayne Green

What Will Kilobaud Be Like?

Tell you what — first I’ll tell you what / want in a computer magazine and then you tell me what you want — for the fact is that Kilobaud will be mostly what you want, but I won’t know what that is until you respond.

I look upon computers as fun — a hobby. But I’m by no means oblivious to the coming small computer market.

I realize that if I am going to be in a position to take advantage of the market to come I need to know all I can about computers — how to design them — how to program them — how to use them — how to service them. I have to know what hardware is available and what it will do — what peripherals will work with what systems — what sources there are for programs — what test equipment I need — things like that.

The primary thing I expect from a computer magazine is that I be able to understand it. If I don’t understand articles, that is not my fault, but the fault of the editor. I don’t want to be patronized and I don’t want to be talked down to; I just want to learn as much as I can and have fun while I’m at it.

This brings me to my concept of Kilobaud. I don’t know how much of it will stick, we’ll see. My idea is to publish a computer magazine which will make it possible for newcomers to computing to get up to speed. It is all too easy to get so involved with advanced ideas that you forget the beginner — we’ve done this a bit with 73 in recent years and I’m working hard to get back to where some of 73 is for Novices.

I view Kilobaud much as I do 73 — as a medium for hobbyists to contact hobbyists — sort of a large scale newsletter. We’ll try to keep the editorial ego trips down and go light on the avuncular advice (except in the editorials and answers to letters).

You, the reader and hobbyist, are a prime contributor to Kilobaud. Please make sure you keep an accurate log of your work with your computer system, making note of all problems you encounter and the solutions to same. There may be parts missing from a kit — lousy or perhaps misread instructions — faulty parts — whatever. If you’ll write up your adventures for the letters section of Kilobaud, a lot of people will be able to benefit from your experiences. I’ll try to keep such phrases as “reinventing the wheel” and “bells and whistles” out of Kilobaud ... with your cooperation.



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Wednesday, November 13, 2019

Google Assistant is now available for most Chromebooks via Engadget

My Chromebook showed this update a few days ago and it installed easily. Whenever the Chromebook is awake you can say “Ok, Google” and access all the commands of a Google Home hand-free. This includes smart home commands, too. — Douglas

Google has started rolling out Chrome OS 77, and it makes Assistant widely available to the devices the platform powers. The voice AI used to be a Pixel exclusive, though adventurous users have been able to switch it on as a hidden feature for a while if they're in one of Chrome OS' beta channels. The platform's latest version makes Assistant available "on most Chromebooks," and all users need to do to summon it is to say Hey Google" or click the Assistant logo from the Launcher.

Read Google Assistant is now available for most Chromebooks via Engadget


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Monday, November 11, 2019

Turn Your Raspberry Pi Into a Media Server With Emby via MakeUseOf

I am a Plex user myself, but Emby certainly sounds interesting and a great way of building out a media server for a very inexpensive price. — Douglas

Emby is a media server. While it isn’t as well-known as other solutions (e.g. Plex, or Kodi), open source Emby has client and server software. This means that you can install the server module on the computer with your media on it, then share to other devices using client apps.

Various plugins can extend the features of Emby. You’ll find IPTV plugins for internet TV, for example. Emby also offers built-in parental controls, to help protect your family from sensitive content. While Emby is less well-known than its competitors, the userbase is growing.

For more information, here’s why you should forget Plex and Kodi, and try Emby instead.

Read Turn Your Raspberry Pi Into a Media Server With Emby via MakeUseOf


* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Thursday, November 07, 2019

Alexa: 12 Cool Alexa Routines: Automating My Smart Home with Alexa from Smart Home Solver

I’ve added a few routines to my own home automation. Here are a few ideas for your own smart home. — Douglas

 
 

Automate your whole smart home using Alexa! It’s easy to set up routines to turn on your lights in the morning, lock the door when you leave, announce when it’s time for chores, and more.

We cover 12 awesome Alexa routines ideas in this tutorial, including funny routines, ones with music, and morning/bedtime automation. I was surprised at how much this took my smart home to the next level.

Watch Alexa: 12 Cool Alexa Routines: Automating My Smart Home with Alexa from Smart Home Solver


* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Historical Technology Books - 34 in a series - The gasoline engine (1912) by Harry Goodrich Diefendorf

Technology isn't just computers, networks and phones. Technology has always been part of the human experience. All of our ancestors have looked for ways to help them survive and do less work for more gain. Archive.org has a host of old technology books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. Many of the technologies discussed within these books are being put to use again these days in the back to the land" and homesteading movements. You might even find something that could address one of your own garden or farm issues but has been lost to time and history. Enjoy! --Douglas

 

INTRODUCTORY

THIS book is intended to give briefly the general principles of construction and operation and instructions pertaining to the installation, care and use of internal combustion engines. Care has been used to avoid the extremely technical and to use only the simplest language and descriptive matter.

 



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Wednesday, November 06, 2019

Learn to “Think Like A Coder” with our new series | via TED-Ed Blog

Curious about coding? Want to build your programming skills? Or perhaps you just love a good problem-solving challenge?
We’re thrilled to announce our new 10-episode series: Think Like A Coder. The series, in partnership with YouTube Learning Playlists, will challenge viewers with programming puzzles as the main characters— a girl and her robot companion— attempt to save a world that has been plunged into turmoil.
 

Read Learn to “Think Like A Coder” with our new series | via TED-Ed Blog


* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Sunday, November 03, 2019

The Autonomous Tupperware Boat Is an ArduRover Test Platform via Hackster Blog

A remote controlled boat using Arduino and a host of other add-ons and software tools. There is also a great video with lots of details and testing information. — Douglas

Every experienced maker knows that it’s best to test new software and hardware on a small, low-cost scale. Before pouring money and time into a professional-quality build, you should first run some cheap and dirty experiments. That often means you have projects built from balsa wood and hot glue that you really don’t want other people to see. That’s the case with YouTube channel Rctestflight’s Autonomous Tupperware Boat, but it turned out to be quite the attention getter anyway.

Read The Autonomous Tupperware Boat Is an ArduRover Test Platform via Hackster Blog


* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Thursday, October 31, 2019

Historical Technology Books - 33 in a series - Programming the 6502 by Rodnay Zaks

Technology isn't just computers, networks and phones. Technology has always been part of the human experience. All of our ancestors have looked for ways to help them survive and do less work for more gain. Archive.org has a host of old technology books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. Many of the technologies discussed within these books are being put to use again these days in the back to the land" and homesteading movements. You might even find something that could address one of your own garden or farm issues but has been lost to time and history. Enjoy! --Douglas

PREFACE

This book has been designed as a complete self-contained text to learn programming, using the 6502. It can be used by a person who has never programmed before, and should also be of value to anyone using the 6502.

For the person who has already programmed, this book will teach specific programming techniques using (or working around) the specific characteristics of the 6502. This text covers the elementary to intermediate techniques required to start pro- gramming effectively.

This text aims at providing a true level of competence to the person who wishes to program using this microprocessor. Nat- urally, no book will teach effectively how to program, unless one actually practices. However, it is hoped that this book will take the reader to the point where he feels that he can start program- ming by himself and solve simple or even moderately complex problems using a microcomputer.

This book is based on the author's experience in teaching more than 1000 persons how to program microcomputers. As a result, it is strongly structured. Chapters normally go from the simple to the complex. For readers who have already learned elementary programming, the introductory chapter may be skipped. For others who have never programmed, the final sections of some chapters may require a second reading. The book has been de- signed to take the reader systematically through all the basic concepts and techniques required to build increasingly complex programs. It is, therefore, strongly suggested that the ordering of the chapters be followed. In addition, for effective results, it is important that the reader attempt to solve as many exercises as possible. The difficulty within the exercises has been carefully graduated. They are designed to verify that the material which has been presented is really understood. Without doing the pro- gramming exercises, it will not be possible to realize the full value of this book as an educational medium. Several of the exer- cises may require time, such as the multiplication exercise for example. However, by doing these, you will actually program and learn by doing. This is indispensable.



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Wednesday, October 30, 2019

Use Minecraft to Teach Your Kids Pretty Much Anything via Lifehacker

The flexibility of Minecraft is one reason it is so useful in educational situations. You can use it as is, or build your own worlds, games, or lessons with this. Truly an amazing product. — Douglas

There’s a reason the New York Times calls them “The Minecraft Generation.” Today’s kids and teens have been raised on the game, cutting their teeth on survival mode and moving on to creating complex, multiplayer worlds within Minecraft. But Minecraft’s vast community (112 million people log on per month!) are doing more than playing a game. They are occupied in a deeply engaging educational experience that encourages problem solving, creativity, planning and execution—and can even teach older kids coding and electrical engineering.

Read Use Minecraft to Teach Your Kids Pretty Much Anything via Lifehacker


* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Monday, October 28, 2019

Best Raspberry Pi Camera in 2019 via Android Central

Adding a camera to your Raspberry Pi is simple and can turn the board into a great surveillance camera or a personal computer used for video chatting. Luckily, it's also a pretty inexpensive endeavor, like with most Raspberry Pi accessories. Here are our top picks if you want to add an eye to your Pi.

Read Best Raspberry Pi Camera in 2019 via Android Central


* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!


An interesting link found among my daily reading