Thursday, August 06, 2020

Historical Technology Books - 54 in a series - MacAddict 001 (1996)

 
 
 
 
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Unbound: How Eight Technologies Made Us Human and Brought Our World to the Brink

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Wednesday, August 05, 2020

Imposter Monster via .cult by Honeypot

Photo by Steve Halama on Unsplash

The worst thing about the imposter syndrome is that it manages to convince you it's real even when you know it's not. Here's how the imposter syndrome affected me in my first month as a developer.

I want to share this with juniors in the same situation, as well as seniors who have to work with them. 

But it's also for people of every level because the imposter syndrome affects everyone. Bringing this to light allows all of us to deal better with this ugly imposter monster.

Read Imposter Monster | .cult by Honeypot via cult.honeypot.io



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Monday, August 03, 2020

This is the smallest gaming PC we’ve ever seen via PCGamesN [RasPi]

No really, this thing is tiny. We took a crack at putting together some of the best mini gaming PCs, but frankly, they all pale in comparison to the sheer tininess of this PC. However, to get something this small and authentically gaming PC-looking, you need a lot of patience and a lot of craftsmanship.

Read This is the smallest gaming PC we’ve ever seen via PCGamesN



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Saturday, August 01, 2020

Another Day via Instagram

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Friday, July 31, 2020

Python is great, but stop using it for every damn project via The Next Web

Recently, I had a discussion on Reddit about why someone would opt to use Python over other programming languages. The discussion was pretty good so I decided to write a post about it.

First of all, let me give you my thoughts on Python. This is a programming language I love and it can be used in a wide variety of applications, though I agree that all languages have their faults. I do believe it’s a great language for professionals to use, and also for beginners to enter the fascinating world of programming.

Read Python is great, but stop using it for every damn project via The Next Web



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Wednesday, July 29, 2020

OpenDataCam + balena to "Quantify the World" with AI via Hackster-io

Learn how to run OpenDataCam on balenaCloud, which adds a number of features to make managing a device (or a fleet of dozens) easy. This guide features deployment, remote configuration, how to use the built-in VPN, a public URL, and monitoring device diagnostics.

Read OpenDataCam + balena to "Quantify the World" with AI via Hackster-io



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Monday, July 27, 2020

Creating an online robot fighting game using Arduino MKR1000 WiFi via Arduino Blog

We introduced this concept last year, and have launched three games so far. Our final game of 2019 was SumoBots Battle Royale — where players from anywhere in the world can fight real robots in a battle royale-style arena. The aim of the project was to have the game run semi-autonomously, meaning that the bots could self-reset in between the games, and the arena could run by itself with no human interaction. This was our most complex project to date, and we wanted to share some parts of the build process in more detail, specifically, how we’ve built these robots and hooked them online for people to control remotely.

Read Creating an online robot fighting game using Arduino MKR1000 WiFi via Arduino Blog



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Saturday, July 25, 2020

Hitting the Books: America needs a new public data system via Engadget

Earlier this month the Trump administration stripped the CDC of its control over the nation’s Coronavirus data. By insisting that all case reporting be funneled through the White House, the administration further undermined public trust in its pandemic response and tainted any future release of information with the prospect of having been politicized. But incidents like this are symptomatic of a deeper problem, Julia Lane, a professor of public policy at NYU, explains in her new book, Democratizing Our Data: A Manifesto. She argues that the steady decline in data quality produced by the government that we’ve seen in recent years is not just a threat to our information-based economy but the very foundations of our democracy itself.

Read Hitting the Books: America needs a new public data system via Engadget


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Wednesday, July 22, 2020

Seeing Code: The Widescreen Rant via hack a day

A very geeky link today, but for some of you out there this could be a critical change. Geek On! — Douglas
 

A couple of weeks ago, Linus Torvalds laid down the law, in a particularly Linusesque sort of way. In a software community where tabs vs. spaces can start religious wars, saying that 80-character-wide code was obsolete was, to some, utter heresy. For more background on how we got here, read [Sven Gregori]’s history piece on Hackaday, and you’ll learn that sliced bread and the 80-character IBM punch card both made their debut in July, 1928. But I digress.

When I look at a codebase, I like to see its structure, and I’m not alone. That’s one of the reasons for the Linux Kernel style guide’s ridiculously wide 8-character tabs. Combined with a trend for variable names becoming more and more descriptive, which I take to be a good thing, and monitors’ aspect ratios growing seemingly without end, which I don’t, the 80-column width seems like a relic from the long-gone era of the VT-220.

Read Seeing Code: The Widescreen Rant via hack a day


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Monday, July 20, 2020

A Steampunk Geiger Counter with Raspberry Pi & Grafana via Hackster.io

I built a desktop radiation monitor based on a cheaply available board, added some toggle switches, Nixie tubes and a Raspberry Pi.

I was always a fan of the steampunk style, and having also had experience building steam engines in the past, there was only one real direction this project could go. Once I had my radiation detector kit hooked up to my Raspberry Pi running InfluxDB and Grafana, I found myself woodworking, machining, and fabricobbling an enclosure out of mahogany, brass, copper, toggle switches and, because it just had to be done, Nixie tubes.

Read the story of the almost year-long journey (*cough* some other stuff cropped up…) I went on to make my steampunk vision a reality below, and if you want to get up and running quickly, find out how to build your own simple one.

Read A Steampunk Geiger Counter with Raspberry Pi & Grafana via Hackster.io



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