Thursday, December 05, 2019

Historical Technology Books - 37 in a series - MacWorld April 1984 Premier Issue

Technology isn't just computers, networks and phones. Technology has always been part of the human experience. All of our ancestors have looked for ways to help them survive and do less work for more gain. Archive.org has a host of old technology books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. Many of the technologies discussed within these books are being put to use again these days in the back to the land" and homesteading movements. You might even find something that could address one of your own garden or farm issues but has been lost to time and history. Enjoy! --Douglas
Historical Technology Books - 37 in a series - MacWorld April 1984 Premier Issue

I wrote a couple of freelance articles for Macworld over the years. It was one of my regular monthly purchases and reads during my time in the IT trenches. — Douglas

Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

A New World

Imagine how the fifteenth-cen- tury explorers felt as the first news from the newly dis- covered Western Hemisphere trickled back to Europe. That is the only analogy that approxi- mates the excitement and won- der that I feel about the launching of the Macintosh computer.

As a computer journalist and adventurer, I’ve had the good fortune to serve as an explorer, historian, and guide during the recent unprecedented expan- sion of the personal computer world. When I had my first ex- perience with the Macintosh, however, I realized that all my previous explorations had cov- ered only one continent.

No machine has ever been scaled so perfectly for the indi- vidual user and for the adven- turesome spirit in such an accessible form. I confidently predict that the Mac will change forever our ideas about work and creativity — as well as the way we think about com- puters. The Mac represents a new frontier in computing, and it’s open for all of us to explore, whether we’re computer novices or experts.


Wednesday, December 04, 2019

Sprinting toward a Lab: defining, connecting and writing a book in five days via The Signal

 

A lab is where experimental and research-focused tools, methods, and services are incubated. The starting premise for a lab is often wanting to spur change and make space for new practice and new people. Yet calling something a lab can also signal separation between traditional services and new approaches. Labs, and innovation in general, can seem like a passing fad that promotes shallow thinking about the application of digital technologies. Considering the limited resources and lack of cutting-edge technologies available at most galleries, libraries, archives, and museums (GLAMs), should GLAMs consider opening labs? 

To begin to answer this question, the British Library Lab, which opened in 2013, held a meeting in September of 2018 called “Building Library Labs” to start a conversation among practitioners who were currently running a lab or thinking of opening one. There was a lively enough discussion to warrant another meeting in March of 2019 in Copenhagen. The buzz from these events created a community of “labbers” and the lab-interested that has grown to 250 participants from 20 countries. 

Read Sprinting toward a Lab: defining, connecting and writing a book in five days via The Signal


* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Monday, December 02, 2019

Mouser Electronics and Grant Imahara Explore Prototype Design with Arduino in Latest “Engineering Big Ideas” Series Video via Yahoo Finance

 
In the second video of the Engineering Big Ideas series, Mouser and Imahara take viewers along to Milan, Italy, for a visit to Arduino®, one of the world’s leading open-source hardware and software ecosystems. Imahara sits down with Arduino co-founder and CTO Massimo Banzi to examine the prototyping tools designers and developers use to understand and articulate the capabilities and limits of an idea. The pair also explores how the open source movement contributes to broadening access to innovation. The Engineering Big Ideas series is sponsored by Mouser’s valued suppliers Analog Devices, Intel®, Microchip Technology and Molex.
 

Read Mouser Electronics and Grant Imahara Explore Prototype Design with Arduino in Latest “Engineering Big Ideas” Series Video via Yahoo Finance


* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Thursday, November 28, 2019

Historical Technology Books - 37 in a series - Catalogue and price list of Edison electric light appliances and apparatus (1892)

Technology isn't just computers, networks and phones. Technology has always been part of the human experience. All of our ancestors have looked for ways to help them survive and do less work for more gain. Archive.org has a host of old technology books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. Many of the technologies discussed within these books are being put to use again these days in the back to the land" and homesteading movements. You might even find something that could address one of your own garden or farm issues but has been lost to time and history. Enjoy! --Douglas






Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more


ENDORSEMENT. 


THE EDISON ELECTRIC LIGHT COMPANY do not 

WE manufacture any Electrical Appliances, their only requirements from the manufacturers being that the goods shall conform to the rules of the Engineering Department of the Company, so as to protect the public against inferior and half-invented devices.

The goods in this Catalogue, manufactured by Bergmann & Co., conform to these requirements, and are reason- able in price.'

T. A. EDISON. 


WE respectfully invite careful attention to the illustrations and prices of the appliances for the Edison Electric Light described in this Catalogue, and to the endorsement (on the opposite page) of our work by the inventor, Professor Thomas A. Edison.

Everything thus far devised, or which shall hereafter  be devised, for use in connection with the Edison Light, has and will have the benefit of an experience of years in the manufacture of Professor Edison's various inventions, as well as of his own frequent personal supervision and advice. Exhaustive experiments have been made to determine the best method, form and arrangement for every device illus- trated within, and, after thorough trial, only those proving the most reliable and economical have been adopted. All appliances are carefully examined and tested before leaving our establishment.

These goods are therefore offered in the confident belief  that they will prove eminently satisfactory.

BERGMANN & CO., NEW YORK.


* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Wednesday, November 27, 2019

Jazzberry Bakes The Pi Into A Mechanical Keyboard via hack a day



If you hang around Hackaday long enough, pretty soon you’ll start to see some patterns emerging. As the nexus of all things awesome in the hacking world, our front page offers a unique vantage point by which you can see what’s getting folks excited this particular month, year, or decade. Right now we can tell you hackers love the Raspberry Pi, 3D printing, and perhaps above all, they can’t get enough mechanical keyboards.
So that makes the Jazzberry by [Mattis Folkestad] something of a perfect storm in the hacker world. The project uses a 3D printed enclosure to combine a Raspberry Pi 3B+ and an Ajazz AK33 mechanical keyboard into a single unit like the home computers of old. Honestly, we’re just glad he didn’t sneak an ESP8266 in there; as the resulting combination might have been enough to crash the site.
Read Jazzberry Bakes The Pi Into A Mechanical Keyboard via hack a day


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Monday, November 25, 2019

Worried About Bats In Your Belfry? A Tale Of Two Bat Detectors via Hackaday

As somebody who loves technology and wildlife and also needs to develop an old farmhouse, going down the bat detector rabbit hole was a journey hard to resist. Bats are ideal animals for hackers to monitor as they emit ultrasonic frequencies from their mouths and noses to communicate with each other, detect their prey and navigate their way around obstacles such as trees — all done in pitch black darkness. On a slight downside, many species just love to make their homes in derelict buildings and, being protected here in the EU, developers need to make a rigorous survey to ensure as best as possible that there are no bats roosting in the site.

Read Worried About Bats In Your Belfry? A Tale Of Two Bat Detectors via Hackaday


* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Historical Technology Books - 36 in a series - Family Computing Magazine Issue 01 (1983)

Technology isn't just computers, networks and phones. Technology has always been part of the human experience. All of our ancestors have looked for ways to help them survive and do less work for more gain. Archive.org has a host of old technology books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. Many of the technologies discussed within these books are being put to use again these days in the back to the land" and homesteading movements. You might even find something that could address one of your own garden or farm issues but has been lost to time and history. Enjoy! --Douglas

Another of the many computing magazines that used to exist pre-Internet. I remember reading this each month along with many others. There is a near-complete archive of past issues available, too. — Douglas

Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Wednesday, November 20, 2019

Solar-Powered IoT Sensors Could Improve Nation's Infrastructure via Engineering

An analysis of the U.S. Department of Transportation’s 2018 National Bridge Inventory (NBI) database suggests that roughly 9 percent of all U.S. bridges are considered “structurally deficient.” That's more than 54,000 potentially unsafe bridges. Even worse, the rate of repair is lower now than it was five years ago. Think about that the next time you cross a bridge. (I do.)

The good news is that the growth of low-power smart sensors, the Internet of Things, solar power, and battery technology could help engineers detect significant problems before they become catastrophic. One researcher working to make that happen is Dr. Jennifer Bridge, professor of civil engineering at the University of Florida.

Read Solar-Powered IoT Sensors Could Improve Nation's Infrastructure via Engineering


* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Monday, November 18, 2019

I made a Doorbell that Knocks Under my Computer Desk | Arduino via Ty Palowski

I was tired of not hearing Uber Eats and Amazon, so I made a haptic "knocker" doorbell powered by Arduino and RF433 transmitters/receivers.

Watch I made a Doorbell that Knocks Under my Computer Desk | Arduino via Ty Palowski


* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!


An interesting link found among my daily reading

Thursday, November 14, 2019

Historical Technology Books - 35 in a series - Kilobaud 1977 01

Technology isn't just computers, networks and phones. Technology has always been part of the human experience. All of our ancestors have looked for ways to help them survive and do less work for more gain. Archive.org has a host of old technology books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. Many of the technologies discussed within these books are being put to use again these days in the back to the land" and homesteading movements. You might even find something that could address one of your own garden or farm issues but has been lost to time and history. Enjoy! --Douglas

Kilobaud Microcomputing was originally conceived as KiloByte Microcomputing but that name went unused as the publishers didn't feel like advertising their goals. The Kilobaud prefix was eventually removed as well and Microcomputing lived on.

Microcomputing was a typical general purpose Personal Computer magazine like Byte and Creative Computing. It offered product reviews, technical information and the occasional program listing for the reader to type in. — Vintage Computer

Available in PDF, Text, JPG formats, and more

8K MEMORY CARDS ANNOUNCED -

For those 6800 systems needing the maximum possible amount of memory, Southwest Technical Products announ- ces 8K memory cards. These memory expansion cards have 8K Bytes of low power MOS memory per board. These kits feature the new 4K static RAMS that are now becoming available. These new RAMS make it possible to put 8K of memory on a board without crowding the parts, or using small hard to solder connecting lines. These new memory boards feature DIP switch address selec- tion and a write protect switch on each board.

The low power consumption of this new memory board makes it possible to use up to 48K of memory in the stand- ard 6800 chassis with the stock power supply. Priced at $250.00 these mem- ory cards cost no more than less dense memories from other sources.


Wayne Green

What Will Kilobaud Be Like?

Tell you what — first I’ll tell you what / want in a computer magazine and then you tell me what you want — for the fact is that Kilobaud will be mostly what you want, but I won’t know what that is until you respond.

I look upon computers as fun — a hobby. But I’m by no means oblivious to the coming small computer market.

I realize that if I am going to be in a position to take advantage of the market to come I need to know all I can about computers — how to design them — how to program them — how to use them — how to service them. I have to know what hardware is available and what it will do — what peripherals will work with what systems — what sources there are for programs — what test equipment I need — things like that.

The primary thing I expect from a computer magazine is that I be able to understand it. If I don’t understand articles, that is not my fault, but the fault of the editor. I don’t want to be patronized and I don’t want to be talked down to; I just want to learn as much as I can and have fun while I’m at it.

This brings me to my concept of Kilobaud. I don’t know how much of it will stick, we’ll see. My idea is to publish a computer magazine which will make it possible for newcomers to computing to get up to speed. It is all too easy to get so involved with advanced ideas that you forget the beginner — we’ve done this a bit with 73 in recent years and I’m working hard to get back to where some of 73 is for Novices.

I view Kilobaud much as I do 73 — as a medium for hobbyists to contact hobbyists — sort of a large scale newsletter. We’ll try to keep the editorial ego trips down and go light on the avuncular advice (except in the editorials and answers to letters).

You, the reader and hobbyist, are a prime contributor to Kilobaud. Please make sure you keep an accurate log of your work with your computer system, making note of all problems you encounter and the solutions to same. There may be parts missing from a kit — lousy or perhaps misread instructions — faulty parts — whatever. If you’ll write up your adventures for the letters section of Kilobaud, a lot of people will be able to benefit from your experiences. I’ll try to keep such phrases as “reinventing the wheel” and “bells and whistles” out of Kilobaud ... with your cooperation.



* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library