Monday, June 01, 2020

Super scale active suspension, arduino powered, 3D printed, RC drift, Oldsmobile Dynamic 88 via SuperScale2020

 
 

The whole idea of the project was to see how close to reality I can make a scale model perform.  Spring rates and resonance frequencies don't scale down realistically when you go down to a 1:10 size, so I had to figure something else out. I've seen active suspension systems made before, but to improve handling. I'm doing the exact opposite. The whole system consists of a an accelerometer, connected to an arduino board, which controls 4 servos, each one controlling the ride height at each corner. It didn't start as a drift chassis, but eventually became one, so the front suspension and steering was also re-engineered to allow for a great turning angle. 

Read Super scale active suspension, arduino powered, 3D printed, RC drift, Oldsmobile Dynamic 88 via Superscale2020


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Saturday, May 30, 2020

USB Password Keeper Runs on Tiny Chip via hack a day

The most important rule of password use, especially when used for online logins, is to avoid reusing passwords. From there, one’s method of keeping track of multiple passwords can vary considerably. While memorization is an option in theory, in practice a lot of people make use of a password manager like Lastpass or KeePass. For those with increased security concerns, though, you may want to implement a USB password keeper like this one based on an ATtiny.

Read USB Password Keeper Runs on Tiny Chip via hack a day



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Thursday, May 28, 2020

Home School: 5 Programming ANTIPATTERNS for Beginners! via Andy Sterkowitz on YouTube

When you're new to programming you might fall prey to some bad programming practices. In today's video I am going to cover the 5 most common bad practices (or antipatterns) that I see with newer developers.

Watch Home School: 5 Programming ANTIPATTERNS for Beginners! via Andy Sterkowitz on YouTube

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Wednesday, May 27, 2020

How to Get Early Access to Google Chrome's New Safety and Design Updates via Gizmodo

Google announced a number of new features, tweaks, and additions to Chrome yesterday. In typical Google fashion, some are available for you to play with right now and some you’ll have to wait on. We’ve done the grunt work, and put together a comprehensive guide to unlocking every feature Google talked about yesterday (and what they are).

Before we begin, make sure you’re using the latest, stable version of Google Chrome, which should be version 83.0.4103.61 as of this writing. To check, or to update your browser, click on the triple-dot icon in the upper-right corner and click on Help > About Google Chrome.

Read How to Get Early Access to Google Chrome's New Safety and Design Updates via Gizmodo


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Tuesday, May 26, 2020

How Myst Became One of the Best-Selling PC Games of All Time via IGN on YouTube

We discuss how the game Myst became the killer game for the CD-Rom drive back in 1993.

Watch How Myst Became One of the Best-Selling PC Games of All Time via IGN on YouTube


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Gmail now supports multiple signatures via Engadget


Read Gmail now supports multiple signatures via Engadget


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Monday, May 25, 2020

Raspberry Pi: Laser Draws Weather Report via Hackaday

Have you ever wished that a laser could tell you the weather? If you have, then [tuckershannon] has you covered. He’s created a machine that uses a laser and some UV sensitive paper to draw the temperature and a weather icon! And that’s not all! It’s connected to the internet, so it can also show the time and print out messages.

Building on [tuckershannon]’s previous work with glow-in-the-dark drawing, the brains inside this machine is a Raspberry Pi Zero. The laser itself is a 5mw, 405nm laser pointer with the button zip-tied down. Two 28BYJ-48 stepper motors are used to orient the laser, one for the rotation and another for the height angle. Each stepper motor is connected to a motor driver board and then wired directly to the Pi.

Read Laser Draws Weather Report via Hackaday



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Sunday, May 24, 2020

Google is updating the Drive and Docs share window to make it less confusing via The Verge

Google on Tuesday announced a planned update to the permissions window for its Docs, Drive, and Sheets apps that is designed to make sharing files less confusing. Now, when you click the share button, the box that pops up has a clear distinction between who the file is being shared with through a searchable directory of your contacts or co-workers and the permissions the link has

Read Google is updating the Drive and Docs share window to make it less confusing via The Verge



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Saturday, May 23, 2020

Huge 3D-Printed LEGO Go Kart Makes You the Minifig via hack a day

 

The LEGO Technic line is definitely the hacker’s flavor of LEGO. It brings a treasure trove of engineering uses that make axles, gears, pulleys, and motors a thing. The only problem is that it’s the inanimate minifigures having all of the fun. But not if [Matt Denton] has something to say about it. He’s building a huge 3D-printed go-kart with pieces scaled up 8.43 times the size of their LEGO equivalents. That’s large enough for an adult to fit!

Read Huge 3D-Printed LEGO Go Kart Makes You the Minifig via hack a day


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Watch Swords 'n Magic and Stuff - Indie Devlog - Ep. 01 with Michael Kocha via YouTube [Education]

Follow a game from concept through development.