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Link Focus: Trulia - average home prices, crime and school stats, commute time info and more!

Trulia - average home prices, crime and school stats, commute time info and more!

Google Maps Mania linked to Trulia in this article from October of last year, but it looks like Trulia has added a significant amount of information since then. Covering a dozen or more major metropolitan areas, Trulia provides great map visualizations of crime stats, average home and rental prices, school rating , commute times and more. It is a great way to explore your neighborhood and city or any city you might be considering as a home. I wish I had such extensive data when we moved to Los Angeles 28 years ago. Instead, we rented our first apartment, sight unseen, in a city neither one of us had ever visited. It could have been disastrous, but thankfully it all worked out for the best. We ended up buying a home about 4 blocks from where we rented that, now long gone, first apartment. Check out Trulia for some great, desktop investigations. You might even learn something you never knew about your own neighborhood.

Trulia

Visit Trulia to try it for yourself

From Google Maps Mania blog...

Trulia Local has been leading the way in real estate mapping for a few years now. The Trulia Local maps allow property hunters to view local crime data, commuting times, and even where natural hazards are most likely to strike.

Trulia has now launched three more maps that allow users to view neighborhood median sale prices, median listing prices, and price per square foot. The three Google Maps use choropleth layers to visualize the average price of properties, green showing where it is cheaper to live and red indicating neighborhoods that are more expensive. If you zoom out on the map you can even view median sale prices at county level.

 
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Link Focus is a series that comments on some of the links I share on my social media accounts and here on the web site. To get these links as I find them, subscribe to me on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and elsewhere. Also look for the "My Favorite Things" posts that appear regularly in the blog. These include collections of links for each calendar month.

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