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Historical Technology Books - 33 in a series - Programming the 6502 by Rodnay Zaks

Technology isn't just computers, networks and phones. Technology has always been part of the human experience. All of our ancestors have looked for ways to help them survive and do less work for more gain. Archive.org has a host of old technology books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. Many of the technologies discussed within these books are being put to use again these days in the back to the land" and homesteading movements. You might even find something that could address one of your own garden or farm issues but has been lost to time and history. Enjoy! --Douglas

PREFACE

This book has been designed as a complete self-contained text to learn programming, using the 6502. It can be used by a person who has never programmed before, and should also be of value to anyone using the 6502.

For the person who has already programmed, this book will teach specific programming techniques using (or working around) the specific characteristics of the 6502. This text covers the elementary to intermediate techniques required to start pro- gramming effectively.

This text aims at providing a true level of competence to the person who wishes to program using this microprocessor. Nat- urally, no book will teach effectively how to program, unless one actually practices. However, it is hoped that this book will take the reader to the point where he feels that he can start program- ming by himself and solve simple or even moderately complex problems using a microcomputer.

This book is based on the author's experience in teaching more than 1000 persons how to program microcomputers. As a result, it is strongly structured. Chapters normally go from the simple to the complex. For readers who have already learned elementary programming, the introductory chapter may be skipped. For others who have never programmed, the final sections of some chapters may require a second reading. The book has been de- signed to take the reader systematically through all the basic concepts and techniques required to build increasingly complex programs. It is, therefore, strongly suggested that the ordering of the chapters be followed. In addition, for effective results, it is important that the reader attempt to solve as many exercises as possible. The difficulty within the exercises has been carefully graduated. They are designed to verify that the material which has been presented is really understood. Without doing the pro- gramming exercises, it will not be possible to realize the full value of this book as an educational medium. Several of the exer- cises may require time, such as the multiplication exercise for example. However, by doing these, you will actually program and learn by doing. This is indispensable.



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** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

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