Wednesday, January 22, 2020

This “essential piece of computing history” just sold for $43,750 via Opposable Thumbs

An amazing piece of machinery that pre-saged the coming digitization and computerization of the world. Concepts developed here were well established in the minds of those — like Babbage — who sought to make computing engines and “computerize” the world! - Douglas

 
 

Charles Babbage is widely recognized as a pioneer of the programable computer due to his ingenious designs for steam-driven calculating machines in the 19th century. But Babbage drew inspiration from a number of earlier inventions, including a device invented in 1804 by French weaver and merchant Joseph Marie Jacquard. The device attached to a weaving loom and used printed punch cards to "program" intricate patterns in the woven fabric. One of these devices, circa 1850, just sold for $43,750 at Sotheby's annual History of Science and Technology auction.

"Technically, the term 'Jacquard loom' is a misnomer," said Cassandra Hatton, a senior specialist with Sotheby's. "There's no such thing as a Jacquard loom—there's a Jacquard mechanism that hooks onto a loom." It's sometimes called a Jacquard-driven loom for that reason.

There were a handful of earlier attempts to automate the weaving process, most notably Basile Bouchon's 1725 invention of a loom attachment using a broad strip of punched paper and a row of hooks to manipulate the threads. Jacquard brought his own innovations to the concept.

Read This “essential piece of computing history” just sold for $43,750 via Opposable Thumbs


An interesting link found among my daily reading

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